Arya Stark, Feminist

Let’s talk Arya Stark and my endless love for her character.

How much did I love this line during the sword instruction scene in the most recent episode?

“Boy, girl… you are a sword, that is all.”

This line was her instructor’s response to Arya’s assertion that she was a girl (he’d been calling her boy all throughout previously) which I felt was important; she was making it clear that she was a girl, yes, but that didn’t mean she couldn’t learn how to correctly use a sword and she was asking him not to default ability to a particular gender. His response made it clear that he may have just been teasing and that he didn’t see her as anything else but a willing student.

Game of Thrones is a show that usually lives me physically stressed, especially the first few episodes- what with the raping women and killing puppies. However there is a light, and it shines bright in Arya Stark, Lord Stark’s youngest daughter who doesn’t understand why embroidery matters more than learning to defend yourself. Arya Stark, whose brothers, or at least one, acknowledge her potential skill and interest in weaponry (she’s a damn good shot). Arya Stark, who named her sword needle, to the utter chagrin of her embroidery instructor (were she to find out). Arya Stark, who is all around made of awesome.

Advertisements

2 Responses to Arya Stark, Feminist

  1. Ann says:

    While I love Arya, I don’t think that she alone is carrying the light of feminism in Game of Thrones or ASOIAF. I think that would be saying that there is only one way to be a feminist or just one way to depict feminist ideals. I might be influenced by my knowledge of where all the female character go in the series but I’d say that these women end up being well-rounded females who are feminist in very different ways. Catelyn is not Arya is not Cersei is not Dany. They all know their strengths and they play to it.

    • I agree, there isn’t just one way to depict feminism and I apologize if my post made it seem like I was saying that. The other female characters are just as complex, I guess Arya is the one I gravitated to most, identified with most; which is why I picked her out to post about.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: