Nigerian Senate Moves To Ban Gay Marriage

The Nigerian senate is moving to ban gay marriage as well as discourage any allies of the Nigerian LGBTQIA community. According to Nigeria’s Daily Times, all the senators participating in the ‘debate’ took the same stand. That gay marriage is wrong, both morally and spiritually.

“We as a country need to act very fast for this trend not to find its way into our country,” said Obende [the bill’s sponsor]. “Same sex marriage cannot be allowed on moral and religious grounds. The Muslim religion forbids it. Christianity forbids it and the African traditional religion forbids it. It should not be allowed because it will lead to a breakdown of the society.”

To make it worse:

Penal Codes in Nigeria already prohibit same sex marriages or carnal knowledge against natural order in Nigeria. Homosexuality can land men up to 14 years in prison in the South and capital punishment for men in areas under Sharia Islamic Law.

The bill prescribes three years imprisonment for couples convicted of same sex marriage and five years for any person that witnesses, abets and aides the solemnisation of same sex marriages.

Another unfortunate blow against collective LGBTQIA rights in Africa.

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via abortiongang: Transgender and Choice: Can We Start a Conversation?

The language of the last reproductive justice wave was about women, “women’s health,” “women’s needs,” and “women’s rights,” and with good reason, but it is becoming increasingly apparent that that language is exclusionary – too exclusionary, to my mind, for the movement I hope to be a part of building. We’ve had the start of this conversation several times on this blog. Women are no longer the only ones who get pregnant. Many people now can and do get pregnant who do not identify as women. This war on reproductive justice may in many ways still be the “war on women” it is often referred to as, given the narrow gender identities the antichoice community too often ascribes to, but it is not only a war on women when so many people suffer in a silence imposed by language and many kinds of violence.

How do we make prochoice about more than the gender binary? How do we work with language? How do we do direct outreach, how do we make clinics and doctor’s offices and family planning centers truly safe spaces?

abortiongang

Making it clear that I don’t believe it’s anyone’s responsibility to teach/inform, I’d be really excited to see where this conversation goes. More than that, it’s going to require research, and active learning, rather than waiting for someone else to come teach those of us still ignorant on the subject.

Oh yeah, and hopefully this means I’m back on a more regular basis.

cool links: The Untitled Black Lesbian Elder Project Shows that Love is Ageless via Colorlines

Something to smile wide about:

The Untitled Black Lesbian Elder Project,” which will highlight several black lesbian women in their 60s, 70s and 80s, talking about their experiences.

The documentary will be a collaborative effort between filmmaker Tiona McClodden and Lisa C. Moore, publisher of Red Bone Press, which publishes books by black gay and lesbian authors. It’s fitting that Moore is one of the masterminds behind this project, since she saw Red Bone as a way to cultivate understanding between black queer culture and black mainstream culture when other publishers said there was “no market” for that kind of work.

McClodden commented on the difficulty of finding positive representations of people of color in the queer scene:

I hope this film will provide a way for Black lesbians like me to see each other and be affirmed in our existence as a powerful and strong social force with important opinions. We, as black lesbians, have something to say, and if given the opportunity can and will say it loudly.

You should keep tabs on their progress via the project’s Tumblr.

Ugandan MPs Walk Out In Protest of The Kill The Gays Bill

Further continuing to defy western expectations that us poor oppressed marginalized people of color aren’t possessive of our agency, Ugandan female members of parliament staged a walk in explicit protest of the anti-homosexuality bill. Colorlines via AP reports that the bill is due for a special hearing today.

Bahati’s original bill would mandate a death sentence for active homosexuals living with HIV or in cases of same-sex rape. “Serial offenders” also would face capital punishment. Anyone convicted of a homosexual act would face life imprisonment.

Anyone who “aids, abets, counsels or procures another to engage of acts of homosexuality” would face seven years in prison. Landlords who rent rooms or homes to homosexuals also could get seven years.

If the bill is picked up by the next session, some, all or none of those provision could change during parliament negotiations.

CNN reports that the State Departments official position is condemnation of the bill:

The State Department Thursday condemned a proposed bill in the Ugandan parliament that could make engaging in homosexual acts a capital offense punishable by death. The bill may be debated Friday by the Ugandan parliament.

“No amendments, no changes, would justify the passage of this odious bill,” State Department spokesman Mark Toner told reporters. “Both (President Barack Obama) and (Secretary of State Hillary Clinton) publicly said it is inconsistent with universal human rights standards and obligations.”

[…]

The State Department says the current bill appeared on the parliament’s agenda Wednesday but lawmakers adjourned without debating it. The parliament plans to reconvene Friday, but Toner said it is not clear whether the bill will be debated or whether an amended bill still contains the death penalty.

Meanwhile the original author of the bill, and prime proponent of the proposal, David Bahati, continues to be a bigot in the most spectacular of ways, referring to homosexuals as victims in need of care.

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