signal boost: Day of Silence

From the website:

On the National Day of Silence hundreds of thousands of students nationwide take a vow of silence to bring attention to anti-LGBT name-calling, bullying and harassment in their schools.

From the blog:

Four Things You Should Know about Student Rights and Day of Silence (2011)

1. You DO have a right to participate in Day of Silence and other expressions of your opinion at a public school during non-instructional time: the breaks between classes, before and after the school day, lunchtime, and any other free times during your day. If your principal or a teacher tells you otherwise, you should contact our office or the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network.

2. You do NOT have a right to remain silent during class time if a teacher asks you to speak. If you want to stay quiet during class on Day of Silence, we recommend that you talk with your teachers ahead of time, tell them that you plan to participate in Day of Silence and why it’s important to you, and ask them if it would be okay for you to communicate in class on that day in writing. Most teachers will probably say yes.

3. Your school is NOT required to “sponsor” Day of Silence. But Day of Silence is rarely a school-sponsored activity to begin with – it’s almost always an activity led by students. So don’t be confused – just because your school isn’t officially sponsoring or participating in Day of Silence doesn’t mean that you can’t participate.

4. Students who oppose Day of Silence DO have the right to express their views, too. Like you, they must do so in a civil, peaceful way and they only have a right to do so during non-instructional time. For example, they don’t have a right to skip school on Day of Silence without any consequences, just as you don’t have a right to skip school just because you don’t like what they think or say.

More info at the blog post!

Today In Awesome: Arizona Students Fight Back || COLORLINES

Students at the University of Arizona are fighting back against the anti-immigrant sentiment prevalent in their state. The students erected their own border fence. They deconstruct the oppressive image of a border fence by using the fence to inform and teach students and any passer-by.

Border-Fence-Pic5.jpg

The fence spans the length of four football fields and runs along one side of the campus quad, forcing students to walk all the way around it. While a few people have complained about the inconvenience, student leaders told me that many people said thanks for providing a focal point that got people to rethink borders.

[…]

College Republicans put out their own perspective through a memorial near the fence honoring fallen border patrol officers…No Mas Muertes did a great job of responding when that memorial was vandalized (someone wrote bad things in chalk on the sidewalk in front of it). Member Francisco Baires told KGUN9 News that he was appalled that someone “desecrated” the Border Patrol memorial and that the fence honored all those who died on the border, migrant and law enforcement alike. Good answer.

The article ends with a tip from from Scholarships A-Z, an organization that helps young undocumented immigrants figure out how to navigate getting into and paying for college: “Be patient. Laws can be changed. Don’t give up, be future oriented.”

Definitely read the full article and view more photos at ColorLines.

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