Ashley Judd vs. Hip-Hop (This Is The Remix)

I was reading through my last post on Ashley Judd and her comments on hip-hop and I felt I needed to clarify some things, at least for my own sanity.

When I said:

Even though my knee-jerk reaction is to defend hip-hop (too much of hip-hop’s stereotypes are transferred to Black people), I will agree that the majority of hip-hop culture is sexist, and by that I mean that the majority of ‘mainstream hip-hop’ (what you hear day in, day out), and let’s just face it- Lauryn Hill and her ilk, don’t feature on our radios and music charts as much as we say we’d like…

This is what I meant:

We need to have this discussion,  we need to have this discussion. This is not a discussion to be co-opted by rich white women who have no idea what it means to be the black woman violated repeatedly in some rap lyrics for young white male consumption. This might seem defensive, but I can bitch and moan and beg people to listen to Lauryn Hill but Ashley Judd has no right, none, to broad-stroke my culture. Do you know that ridiculous pic with a bunch of white dudes standing around in lab coats and the tagline “Female Orgasm Discovered!” right under their photo? That’s how wrong this unsolicited commentary felt to me and my hip-hop lauded big ass.

…to ignore the concept of ‘buying power’ in a capitalist system (which we can all admit, the mainstream music business exists in) would be ridiculous.

I’ll give you three guesses what demographic has the most ‘buying power’.

I’m hip-hop’s down to ride chick. This doesn’t mean I won’t be calling it out on its bullshit, it means that I will be the one calling it out on its bullshit (and honoring its Lauryns and Lupes), thank you very much Ashley Judd.

To begin with, it is problematic in and of itself, to have a white woman comment on a culture so closely associated with minorities with such blanket criticism. I’m with The Root here…can a sister get some citations?

On that same note, I’d argue that for as much flack hip-hop takes for its tendency towards sexism, it’s not, as she says, “the contemporary soundtrack of misogyny”. This is not the only genre with flagrant misogyny, it’s just always been the scapegoat for misogyny in music…

As for hip-hop? Well this mother of genres gave birth to both Soulja Boy (superman dat hoe) and Lupe Fiasco (all the silence is worse than all the violence). Who do you think sold more?

…to ignore the concept of ‘buying power’ in a capitalist system (which we can all admit, the mainstream music business exists in) would be ridiculous.

I’ll give you three guesses what demographic has the most ‘buying power’.

//

I was quoting from my post: Ashley Judd vs. Hip-Hop.

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Ashley Judd vs. Hip-Hop

Ashley Judd has been catching heat for recent comments on hip-hop and its enabling relationship to rape culture:

“As far as I’m concerned, most rap and hip-hop music – with its rape culture and insanely abusive lyrics and depictions of girls and women as ‘ho’s’ – is the contemporary soundtrack of misogyny.”

I happen to disagree, but with bits and parts.

To begin with, it is problematic in and of itself, to have a white woman comment on a culture so closely associated with minorities with such blanket criticism. I’m with The Root here (though I want to point out that they seem to misunderstand what rape culture means), can a sister get some citations?

On that same note, I’d argue that for as much flack hip-hop takes for its tendency towards sexism, it’s not, as she says, “the contemporary soundtrack of misogyny”. This is not the only genre with flagrant misogyny, it’s just always been the scapegoat for misogyny in music; I also consider the mixing and matching music genres have experienced recently- pop, hip-hop, r&b, rock, etc. aren’t valid methods of delineation anymore.

Even though my knee-jerk reaction is to defend hip-hop (too much of hip-hop’s stereotypes are transferred to Black people), I will agree that the majority of hip-hop culture is sexist, and by that I mean that the majority of ‘mainstream hip-hop’ (what you hear day in, day out), and let’s just face it- Lauryn Hill and her ilk, don’t feature on our radios and music charts as much as we say we’d like, and that’s partly our fault. I say ‘partly’ here because to ignore the concept of ‘buying power’ in a capitalist system (which we can all admit, the mainstream music business exists in) would be ridiculous. I’ll give you three guesses what demographic has the most ‘buying power’.

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